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Summer Days 7

September 15th, 2014

Summer has been the one teacher in my life journey who has taught me the most about valuing life’s moments, expressing gratitude and being happy. Of everyone I’ve encountered in my life, from strangers to those who know and love me, my 12 ½ year old black and white border collie/lab, girl’s best friend and canine constant companion, Summer, is the one who has taught me my most valuable learning in life.

Of all the lessons she has tried to convey in her special doggie way – show love first thing each morning; be joyfully exuberant when doing what you love; delight in the now; always show appreciation to others; work and contribute; and, presume friendshipit is lesson #7 that could just possibly be the most meaningful teaching of all; the one that may very well change my life.

For my life, “being” is not something I’m very good at. Staying busy? Yes. Doing? Achieving? You betcha. Doing for others? Absolutely. But “being”? Not so much. And “being Susan”? Whoa! Now you’re talking crazy. I can only do that with a few people!

The one constant that Summer has exhibited in attitude and actions over the years is that Susan is good enough just as she is. Summer has never expected me to keep her entertained for hours; she hasn’t looked for me to put into action a five-year business plan. I haven’t had to set, meet or exceed a goal; she’s never asked that I put on a smile or pretend interest for the sake of furthering a cause or making nice. I haven’t ever had to put on masks or be anything I’m not. I’ve always just been me.

For Summer, “me” is enough.  She is happy to simply be in the same room with me. She is content to be near me whether we’re interacting or not. With her simple presence, she has communicated:

Lesson #7: Just be yourself. 

IMG_6033As I’ve pondered this lesson over the past month, I’ve realized what a great truth Summer has tried to convey and demonstrate. I’ve repeated the words “Just be Susan” often in my head when faced with moments where I might want to act differently in order to please someone else or put their desires above mine. “Just be Susan”, I’ve come to realize, holds a key to tell me how to live freely. It begs me to be confident that who I am is a gift – as is. Summer has challenged me to trust “me,” to trust myself that I am good. I am enough.

And this unbelievably wise, four-legged, tail-wagging guru – who has the brain of a four-year-old, I might add – has passed on this most valuable, personal lesson by simply embracing and enjoying my presence without me having to do anything to earn her affections and friendship except being myself.

Today, be grateful for the gift you are. Journal about the things that make you uniquely you and that you appreciate and enjoy about yourself. Be proud of who you are. When challenging situations arise and you start to get anxious over how to respond, remind yourself to “Just be you” and then trust that you are enough. Then act from who you are and see what happens. You are good. You are enough.

Summer Days are a 12-part blog series focused on lessons of gratitude passed on from dog to human. This human is still trying to embrace daily the lessons of gratitude, so much so that gratitude gets an entire chapter in the book I wrote with Ann Saylor for educators, youth leaders, and parents called Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working With Youth. In there, lessons of gratitude are shared as a tool for maintaining personal power and strength . . . and teaching youth to do the same.

Free Service-Learning Curriculum

September 12th, 2014
This week America’s ToothFairy released its 2014-2015 Project Plan and Fundraising Guide for Students.  This year we are tackling Health Disparities, Health Professional Shortage Areas, Community Water Fluoridation, and Collaborative Approaches to Oral Health Outreach.
Please visit; http://issuu.com/amertoothfairy/docs/projectplans_packet_v2 to review the Project Plans.  If you would like a pdf copy, email youth@ncohf.org.
Visit: http://issuu.com/amertoothfairy/docs/msm_fundraisingpacket_v2_lr_ab1e7c0d58f0d5 for the Fundraising Guide.  As with the Project Plans, email youth@ncohf.org for a pdf copy.
Everything bolded in the Project Plan book is available on a password protected portal available to program registrants.
Our resources are free of charge, and all organizations/schools receive a free Community Education Kit in the mail and the opportunity to apply for scholarships, prizes, and product donations.
We also offer a Girl Scout and Boy Scout patch for $1.50 per patch (inc. S&H).  More information can be found at: http://www.ncohf.org/our-programs/youth-mentoring-program/scouts
Thank you, and have a great school year!
Katharine Shuster Correll
National Director, Youth Programs
National Children’s Oral Health Foundation: America’s ToothFairy®
4108 Park Road, Suite 300
Charlotte, NC 28209

Sneak Peek into our New Book: Groups, Troops, Clubs and Classrooms: An Essential Handbook for Working with Youth”

September 8th, 2014

We are so excited about our new book which should come in the mail any day!!  It’s called “Groups, Troops, Clubs and Classrooms: An Essential Handbook for Working with Youth“.

This inspiring guide is for teachers, volunteers, group leaders, youth counselors, coaches, and anyone who works with young people. Readers will learn about how young people are wired, how to create inviting classrooms and meeting spaces, and how to connect with students in meaningful, lasting ways. Find dozens of strategies to help young people discover their inner strengths and passions. Dozens of games, activities, icebreakers, and quizzes will keep you and your young people engaged and motivated.

We thought you might like a sneak peek into the content, so here are the section titles and chapter titles.  More to come…

Part One: Youth, Strength, and Power

Chapter One: A Strength-Based Approach to Positive Youth Development

Chapter Two: Putting Positive Youth Development to Work

Chapter Three: Understanding How Young People Are Wired

Chapter Four: How Young People Think and See the World

 

Part Two: Activating Power

Chapter Five: Preparation: The Work before the Work

Chapter Six: Connect with Them

Chapter Seven: Know Them

Chapter Eight: Engage Them

Chapter Nine: Stretch Them

Chapter Ten: Challenge Them

Chapter Eleven: Power Up

 

Part Three:  Sustaining Power

Chapter Twelve: The Practice of Self-Mastery

Chapter Thirteen: The Practice of Gratitude

Chapter Fourteen: The Practice of Recharging

Summer Days 6

September 8th, 2014

Summer Days are a 12-part blog series focused on lessons of gratitude passed on from dog to human. This human is still trying to embrace daily the lessons of gratitude, so much so that gratitude gets an entire chapter in the book I wrote with Ann Saylor for educators, youth leaders, and parents called Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working With Youth. In there, lessons of gratitude are shared as a tool for maintaining personal power and strength . . . and teaching youth to do the same.

My ever-loving canine teacher on how to live well in this world, Summer, didn’t believe in strangers and thus her on doggy version of friendship expressed in her very doggy way was this lesson:

Lesson #6: Lean into strangers or nose them.

IMG_6342

You’ve probably seen it or experienced it. Think: Have you ever taken a dog for a walk or met a dog on a walk? Your dog or the one you met often pull said human to the new person to meet them. Assuming the dog is friendly, there is this built-in wiring to know another. Unfortunately, this knowing can be presumptuous at times (embarrassing the owner) as medium to large dogs head straight for the crotch of the new friend. (Note: if you want to avoid said embarrassment, get a small dog.)

Summer sometimes headed straight for the crotch but more frequently, she went over and leaned into the “potential new friend” with the whole side of her body. What else can you do if a dog leans into you but pet her? Summer’s theory was that by giving body hugs, said “stranger” was no longer a stranger but a new friend, one worthy of sharing affection with.

Summer presumed friendship and made it so. What would our days look like if we presumed welcome, friendship or acceptance? How different would our days look if we presumed that the universe was FOR us and not against us? Or if we presumed that others wanted to connect with us as much as we want to connect with them?

Today, presume friendship, presume welcome and make it so. I don’t suggest you express it in a doggy version, but that you do so in a very human way. Offer a smile, thanks, an expression of appreciation or a sincere compliment. Give a hug, pat a shoulder, look someone in the eye and listen. Presume goodness, send it out and watch it come back to you.

Practice all the lessons of Summer Days: show love first thing each morning; be joyfully exuberant when doing what you love; delight in the now; always show appreciation to others; and, work and contribute.

Summer Days 5

September 2nd, 2014

Summer Days are a 12-part blog series focused on lessons of gratitude passed on from dog to human. This human is still trying to embrace daily the lessons of gratitude, so much so that gratitude gets an entire chapter in the book I wrote with Ann Saylor for educators, youth leaders, and parents called Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working With Youth. In there, lessons of gratitude are shared as a tool for maintaining personal power and strength . . . and teaching youth to do the same.

One of the unexpected lessons that my canine coach in gratitude taught me had to do with work. Summer is part border collie and as such she likes to work. Since we live in the city and not on a farm where she could herd cattle, early on she created for herself jobs to do.

It’s been a struggle to exactly name this particular lesson in happiness so I’ll give it two and you can pick the one you like:

Lesson #5: Get a job! Work is good.  Or Always contribute to the pack.

As Summer’s student, I’m still working on which of those two lesson titles is the real lesson she’s been trying to convey. Or maybe it’s both.

Regardless, early on in Summer’s 12 ½ years, she decided she had to have a job anIMG_0467d contribute to the pack. Her first job was on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5:30-8:30 p.m. every week. She created and chose the job for herself. On those evenings my husband left the house at (can you guess?) 5:30 to go teach a martial arts class. Summer would go to our workout room and sit where she could face the door that went outside and the door that opened out to the backyard. She guarded. And when he returned at 8:30 p.m., she’d leave the room and return to the family.

Her job changed when Pete let that class go. She then rolled with the change by going out into the backyard every night, announcing vocally to the neighborhood that she was on shift and she continued said announcement until her shift was over. (Thankfully her shift of barking only lasted an hour every evening, but she did change from 2 nights a week to 7 nights a week . . .)

She wasn’t asked to do either of these jobs. She just did it. She contributed to the well-being of the family and was happy to have work to do.

When you combine this lesson with the other ones she’s taught:  show love first thing each morning; be joyfully exuberant when doing what you love, delight in the now and always show appreciation to others, you begin to see a pattern of appreciating the gifts each day brings – whether that’s loved ones and others around you, the current moment, doing what you love or even the ability to contribute to make this world better for others. You take it ALL in and embrace it all. It’s all good.

Sometimes a job may seem like it’s just a job. Can you, today, find reasons to be thankful for the job you have? Can you see its value for helping others? Can you see how what you do makes a difference to someone? Identify ways what you do counts and give thanks.

Summer Days 4

August 25th, 2014

Summer Days are a 12-part blog series focused on lessons of gratitude passed on from dog to human. This human is still trying to embrace daily the lessons of gratitude –  so much so that gratitude gets an entire chapter in the book I wrote with Ann Saylor for educators, youth leaders, and parents called Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working With Youth. In there, lessons of gratitude are shared as a tool for maintaining personal power and strength . . . and teaching youth to do the same.

As I think about the things that Summer, my rescued border collie/lab, has taught me, I realize that her bright soulful spirit really showed up in this world to be a Gratitude Guru. Her job has been to show us over and over, how to be thankful and express thanks.

From her we’ve learned to show love first thing each morning; be joyfully exuberant when you get to do the things you love and to delight in the now.

As I reflect on a typical Summer day, I have seen how she expresses big love on two very different occasions every day. She first expresses love for taking walks (see Summer Days 2) in a very exuberant, happy dance way. When we return from said walk, she waits patiently to gently express love and gratitude for me, her human.

It is in this constant action that she has taught me lesson #4: Always show IMG_6040appreciation/affection when you get to do what you love with the one you love.

Every single day, this is how the lesson plays out after we return from a walk: Summer follows me around the house, keeping me in full eyesight until I am done with tasks and the opportunity presents itself for her to express affection and appreciation. Literally, daily, the routine follows that pattern. After the walk, I get a shower. Summer sits and guards the bathroom door until I come out. I walk to another room when she positions herself across the hall so she can watch me as I get ready. She then follows me to the kitchen for breakfast and then to the living room where I sit to meditate. Once I sit down and have quit moving, she comes over, leans into me, gives me a lick on my hand, receives a pat on the head, her tail wags a “thanks” and then she finally goes to her bed to settle down . . . but still with me in eyesight.

No matter how long it takes me to get to that chair, she follows me around and waits for the moment when she can say thanks. She never neglects her job to say thanks. And, she never forgets.

How faithful are you in remembering to say thanks when someone has done or said something kind to you? Have there been times when you meant to but life happened and next thing you know, time has passed and it seems too late to express appreciation?

Today look for opportunities to show appreciation to others for who they are and the nice things they do. Maybe it’s the coffee barista who remembers what you drink before you ask. Or, the receptionist who makes copies for you all the time. Or maybe it’s a stranger who lets you go through the door first. Look for ways to show appreciation and kindness to your colleagues and family. You never know what they’re going through and a word or act of kindness may just possibly make their day.

Save the Date: RAGSDALE & SAYLOR AUTHOR EVENT

August 19th, 2014

Join Susan & Ann, best-selling authors of Great Group Games for their new book release

Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms:

The Essential Handbook for working with Youth

October 4, 2014

2:00 p.m. at Parnassus Books

3900 Hillsboro Pike.  Nashville, Tennessee  37215

Find other books by Susan Ragsdale & Ann Saylor at www.TheAssetEdge.net

Summer Days 3

August 18th, 2014

Summer Days are a 12-part blog series focused on lessons of gratitude passed on from dog to human. This human is still trying to embrace daily the lessons of gratitude –  so much so that gratitude gets an entire chapter in the book I wrote with Ann Saylor for educators, youth leaders, and parents called Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working With Youth. In there, lessons of gratitude are shared as a tool for maintaining personal power and strength . . . and teaching youth to do the same.

 

In the previous two blogs, the life lessons taught by Summer, our beloved canine Happiness Teacher, were to show love first thing each morning and be joyfully exuberant when you get to do the things you love. Closely connected to her teaching of lesson two is lesson three which is:

Delight in the now.IMG_2467

Now, I have to admit that I’m a poor student at times with this particular lesson. I think my husband does a much better job at this one. I too often am thinking about what needs to be done for tomorrow, next week, next month – and I’m ashamed to say – even next year. I often miss the importance of now.

But Summer? She has the “now” down pat! When we’ve gone on walks, it isn’t just a walk. It’s an adventure. On any given said walk, there is a constant shifting of how she stays in the now by sniffing, exploring, showing curiosity toward sights, cats, dogs, chickens, rabbits, birds or humans. She has always been on the move engaging all her senses to see what can be seen, smell what can be smelled and play with what can be played with.

IMG_3957Summer has shown a tendency for creating her own form of “play” while we walk. She has stalked the path’s edges to catch or sniff out crickets; she’s hunted for bunnies; she’s stuck her nose in water holes to push at frogs and has even pounced on water to make waves.  All games – never for harm. (It’s true! No bunnies have ever been hurt in the making of our walks. She catches and releases.) Her choice of play has depended on the season of the year.

And all of her actions she repeats every single day, every single walk. Every day that walk is fresh, new, delightful and well, now. It never gets old to her and she approaches each one with the same joyful exuberance and appreciation.

Do you find that you tend to think about the past or the future instead of the now? Are you able to take any given moment and be fully present in it savoring all the sights, smells, tastes and feel of the present moment? What happens when you do? How do you feel inside when you fully immerse yourself in the present moment?

Pick several moments today and try to be as open as you can to everything that’s going on in those moments. Savor them. Experience them fully. Give yourselves to now and live your life in this moment. Make it count.

Summer Days 2

August 11th, 2014

Summer Days are a 12-part blog series focused on lessons of gratitude passed on from dog to human. This human is still trying to embrace daily the lessons of gratitude –  so much so that gratitude gets an entire chapter in the book I wrote with Ann Saylor for educators, youth leaders, and parents called Groups, Troops, Clubs & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working With Youth. In there, lessons of gratitude are shared as a tool for maintaining personal power and strength . . . and teaching youth to do the same.

Summer, the four-pawed Gratitude Coach, who came into our home over a decade ago, has taught us many lessons in being happy every day. Last blog we shared her value in showing love first thing every day (lick, nuzzle, thumping of tail in pure excitement . . .) with greeting and showing affection.

IMG_2245Lesson #2 as we look at a chronological snapshot of her day is this: Be joyfully exuberant when you get to do the things you love.

I’m not sure why, but Summer chose the act of me brushing my teeth to be her signal that we were going to get ready to go for a walk. I can’t begin to tell you how tough that choice has been. Why not when I put on my running shoes? Or pick up her leash? But, brushing teeth in the morning?

Philosophically, I could read into that choice as her nudging to say, “You’ve got your teeth done, now it’s time to take care of the rest of your body. Good choice! Let’s go for a walk.” I could but . . .

Whatever was going on in that doggie brain, the fact remains that she has always LOVED going for a walk. When she knows we’re going, she talks, she dances around and it’s the only time she EVER shows impatience. Once the decision is made, she is simply mad to get going and is so excited she’ll run from human to human to dog . . . or from dog to human to human – depending on where one is standing.

In other words, she is joyfully exuberant and shows extreme gratitude for getting to do the thing she loves.

What do you love to do? Do you include it in your day? Do you take it for granted, or do you show gratitude for “the thing” you love doing facially, verbally or with full body wag and dance?

Today, remember to express thanks in some form (we recommend the full body wag just for the heck of it) for the things you do that you enjoy. Those things – be it sipping coffee, drawing, running, building, making a pie or shooting hoops on lunch break – are the very things that add life to the day and are worth noting and giving thanks for every time. . . because you just never know if some day they may slip away from your life and then you’ll miss them.

If you missed the first lesson, click here to read about the importance of showing love first thing each day.

Ten Ways to Fight Hate

August 7th, 2014

 

  1. ACT     
  2. UNITE      
  3. SUPPORT THE VICTIMS      
  4.  DO YOUR  HOMEWORK      
  5. CREATE AN ALTERNATIVE TO VIOLENCE
  6. SPEAK UP      
  7. LOBBY LEADERS               
  8. LOOK LONG RANGE          
  9. TEACH TOLERANCE          
  10. DIG DEEPER      

See the full article with more details on each step at http://www.wsu.edu/PHRC/fighthate.html 

What’s Under Your Cape? SUPERHEROES of the Character Kind

July 15th, 2014

Greetings from Barbara at The Corner on Character. During my thirty years spent teaching and counseling (all grades preK through 12th) in public education, I have been encouraged time and time again by colleagues and friends to write a book. Since I’d been sharing my ideas for character integration online since 2000, my pat answer was always that I’d posted enough content for a book online, for free. But still, character educators seemed enthusiastic about and eager for a book. Then, one day in early October 2103, I got an email from a cyberspace collaborator in Florida with the word PROMISE in the subject line. Here’s what it said:

Can you promise me one day when you consolidate all of your amazing posts into your future best-selling book that I can get a signed copy? Your posts belong on a bookshelf as well as your blog, especially in libraries everywhere. Dream big, God has incredible plans for you. Love you sweet friend, Tamara

I received the gift of encouragement, from Tamara, that day and shortly afterward, I met Marian from Nelson Publishing and Marketing at the Character Education Partnership National Forum on Character Education where she saw me speak. Before I knew it, I was sending a signed book contract off to Michigan.

contract

Using this guiding question as a focus – What do workshop participants typically leave my sessions having enjoyed and wanting more of? –  the answer, character-infusion stories and strategies, became the basis for What’s Under Your Cape? SUPERHEROES of the Character Kind. It’s a quick guide to character development, aimed at educators and caregivers who have a hand in helping our future leaders crusade for good. Using the acrostic SUPERHEROES to layout the eleven chapters, I’ve infused inspirational interactions with innovative ideas to help develop eleven of the virtues that we can nurture in our caped crusaders as we empower them to soar.

WUYCcover

Here now, an excerpt from Chapter 3 – P is for Perseverance:

So, how do we get our superheroes to stay the course? They have to have permission to fail. They need to know that not only is failure okay but that, according to author Paul Tough, it might be the key to success. In his research, Tough found that grit, resilience, and perseverance were key ingredients in the success stories of their test subjects.10 Kids who don’t give up when they encounter obstacles in their way, who don’t quit when they hit a pothole in the road, and who don’t abandon ship when the winds shift and steering their vessel seems all but impossible are the kids who find the greatest success through their school years and beyond. As we coach these learners, we must encourage them to take risks and to be okay with messing up. They need to know that mistakes are opportunities for reflection, improvement, and growth. We must help them strive to do THEIR best, not be THE best. We have to change the mindset that the silver medal is somehow losing. Silver isn’t losing. It’s coming in second. That’s all. When did silver get so tarnished? Is it possible that we’re raising kids to quit when they think they can’t attain the coveted gold at the end of the rainbow?

When my daughter started in the marching band, she had high hopes for them at the State Marching Contest. They were marching a clean and elegant show with strong music, and they ended up fourth in the State of Texas out of 250 bands their size. Two years and lots of growth and improvement later, their band came out of the preliminary competition number one. But there were still finals with new judges and a clean slate. The students marched their hearts out, and they came in second. They were devastated. Crushed to have gotten so close to gold and yet so far. Second place out of so many bands is good, no doubt, but they set their standards high. They worked hard, and there was a lot of disappointment.

But here’s what superheroes know: winning is a state of mind. There were thousands of students who didn’t even get a trip to the state competition because they didn’t advance out of their district or their area, so just getting to state made them winners. The way that the 271 members, musicians and guard members, together created magic with their music made them winners. Leaving it all on the field, heart and soul, made them winners. It shouldn’t matter, if they worked hard, persevered, and gave it their best, and earned second or fifth or tenth.

 *******

Thank you for your interest in my new release; author-signed copies of the book are available for purchase at The Corner On Character.  For superhero activity ideas, visit my Pinterest page and to come along on our What’s Under Your Cape? book study that starts July 12, check out the book’s Facebook page

See schedule below and check out the first chapter review at http://curlsandasmile.blogspot.com/2014/07/whats-under-your-cape-book-study-and.html

 

 

Ten Keys to Happier Living

April 8th, 2014

I love the keys – they are so practical, yet so life-giving!

Read more here – http://www.actionforhappiness.org/10-keys

Healthy Families = Healthy Kids

March 17th, 2014

Looking for some resources to get into the hands of parents that might inspire them to make healthy choices for their families.  Check out these simple ideas from the YMCA:

http://www.ymca.net/healthy-family-home/

Gift from a Stranger, Gift from Above

March 5th, 2014
Our final sharing of great stories from the Caring Child Contest.  
 
An eye witness account from New York
City , on a cold day in December,
some years ago: A little boy,
about 10-years-old, was standing before a shoe store on the
roadway, barefooted, peering through the window, and shivering
With cold.
   A lady approached the young boy and said,
  ‘My, but you’re in such deep thought staring in that window!’
‘I was asking God to give me a pair of
shoes,’  was the boy’s reply.
   The lady took him by the hand, went into
  the store, and asked the clerk to get half a dozen pairs of socks
for the boy. She then asked if he could give her a basin of water
and a towel. He quickly brought them to her.
She took the little fellow to the back
part of the store and, removing her gloves, knelt down, washed
his little  feet, and dried them with the towel.
By this time, the clerk had returned with
the socks.. Placing a pair upon the boy’s feet, she purchased him
a pair of shoes..
  She tied up the remaining pairs of socks
and gave them to him.. She patted him on the head and said, ‘No
doubt, you will be more comfortable now..’
   As she turned to go, the astonished kid
caught her by the hand, and looking up into her face, with tears
in his eyes, asked her,   ‘Are you God’s wife?’
Do YOU have a great story from a child’s life that you want to share?  Comment or send it our way! Let the good vibes continue!

Goodie Bags Build Assets

March 3rd, 2014

My friends Mary & Lauren have been doing a thoughtful family project to help people that are homeless. They help their children decorate lunch bags with cheerful pictures, then they fill the bags with nonperishable snacks like granola bars, raisins, peanut butter crackers, pretzels, juice boxes… When they drive past a homeless person asking for money, they share one of their bags of goodies.

This would be an easy project to do with a class or afterschool club, and you can engage children ages 2-22.

It’s a safe and simple way to help people in need. It teaches your children to recognize people that are in need, and find ways to help. It encourages your children to be creative. It helps families combat the me-me-me attitude that creeps up on all of us.

Here are some of the specific assets this project helps to build:

Youth as resources. Young people are given useful roles in the community. Service to others. Young person feels safe at home, school, and in the neighborhood.
Adult role models. Parent(s) and other adults model positive, responsible behaviour.
Creative activities. Young person spends three or more hours per week in lessons or practice in music, theatre, or other arts.
Caring. Young person places high value on helping other people.
Equality and social justice. Young person places high value on promoting equality and reducing hunger and poverty.
Responsibility. Young person accepts and takes personal responsibility.
Planning and decision making. Young person knows how to plan ahead and make choices.
Interpersonal competence. Young person has empathy, sensitivity, and friendship skills.
Cultural competence. Young person has knowledge of and comfort with people of different cultural/racial/ethnic backgrounds.

I’d love to hear about simple ways you’ve seen children help people in need! You can email me at ann(at)theassetedge(dot)net or simply leave a comment below.