medicines without prescriptions

The key to quality youth development that keeps a kid coming back

November 25th, 2016

Originally published by Karen Beranek

A simple hello is important but it’s not enough. For some youth, you’ll need to go a step beyond that. My son’s active wrestling career began five years ago. It has been amazing to watch his growth through the program. Yes, he’s getting better at take downs, staying off his back and putting his opponent on his back. But that’s not why he goes to practice twice a week. He goes because he is building a relationship with a caring adult – his coach. This may not sound like a big deal, but it is! In the first two years, he couldn’t say hi to the coach because he was so shy. Coach hadn’t had a wrestler quite like that before, but he knew the importance of a welcoming environment, so he re-thought his approach: he took the time to talk to my son individually and show him how to improve on one specific technique. He asked him if he was coming to the next practice. These simple actions showed my son that coach cared about him, that he belonged to this team, and that he could be himself in the practice room.

I am so thankful the coach recognized my son’s need and took it upon himself to re-evaluate how he works with this young person. Now in year five, my son is willing to ask questions, share stories and work directly with this adult who took the time to create a welcoming environment for him, even if this willingness to speak up was years in the making.

Have you had to change how you welcome youth to meet the need of a particular group or an individual young person?  Do you use the “eight keys” in your work?

Read the full article here:  http://blog-youth-development-insight.extension.umn.edu/2016/05/the-key-to-quality-youth-development.html

Who are you grateful for?

November 25th, 2016

originally published by Dr. Lauren Tober

Today I’m inviting you to consider WHO you are grateful for.

 

Take a look at this wonderful video by Soul Pancake.  I had tears.  And smiles.  Lots of smiles.

 

After watching this video, your task, should you choose to accept it, is take photographs of people you’re grateful for.

 

And then share it with them (you knew I was going to say that didn’t you?).

 

Post it on their facebook timeline.

 

Tag them in instagram.

 

Send it via email.

 

If it’s your grandmother, print it out and post it to her.

 

Do whatever you need to do, but be sure to tell someone you’re grateful for them.

 

With gratitude,

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar® on Tour Visits A Home

November 23rd, 2016

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar by Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor has been showing up in its “tour” in after-school settings, camp, classrooms and . . . homes.

Here’s a quick review from Amazon that shares one household’s experience of Brain Boosters (the reviewer let us know that they also pinned it in Pinterest):

bb-at-home

 

 

 

You can create some quick fun moments in your home yourself!

Jar_3d

Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16

A Gratitude Song

November 18th, 2016

Here s a beautiful song called ‘Grateful: A Love Song to the World’  Check it out here...

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar® Stops off at YMCA Camp

November 16th, 2016

During its tour it was only right that Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor, creators of Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar visit the YMCA of Middle Tennessee and see brain boosters in action in a camp setting.  Here’s what one staffer from the Brentwood YMCA had to say:

“Thanks Susan for sharing Brain Boosters with the Brentwood YMCA Day Camp. What a great ice breaker and team builder! My day camp counselors really enjoyed it. You ladies are so creative.”

Many blessings,

Tracey Jernigan

Family Services, Day Camp and Preschool Program Director

YMCA of Middle Tennessee

 

You can see and try Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar out for yourself!

Jar_3d

Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16

 

 

Thanksgiving Poem

November 11th, 2016

 

I had to share this sweet little poem written by 9-year old Anna Kate.  Make your own Thanksgiving acrostic.  What are YOU thankful for?  Ask others that you care about to tell you some of the things they are most grateful for.  thanksgiving

November 11th, 2016

What's the point of helping youth discover their inner beauty, meaning, and giftedness if we don't teach them to take time to delight in who they are?

originally shared by Search Institute:

With Thanksgiving around the corner, it’s the perfect time to encourage the young people in your program or classroom to cultivate a sense of gratitude. Youth development experts Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor devote an entire chapter to the practice of gratitude in their new book, Groups, Troops, Clubs, & Classrooms: The Essential Handbook for Working with Youth.

Ragsdale and Saylor ask readers an interesting question: What’s the point of helping youth discover their inner beauty, meaning, and giftedness if we don’t teach them to take time to delight in who they are?

“Gratitude is simply the act of being grateful,” write Ragsdale and Saylor. “Being grateful that I am strong and healthy, even if I didn’t score any points in the basketball game. Being grateful for my friend who really appreciates me, even when I was shunned by the popular group.”

A strength-based approach is grounded in recognizing what’s right with people, particularly in yourself and the people you interact with every day. Gratitude is so relevant because it changes attitudes, and it helps people focus on the good, instead of the negative.

“Gratitude is a power practice that changes our perspective about life’s joys and hardships. It recharges our batteries when our energy is depleted or we are overwhelmed by life,” say these best-selling authors of Great Group Games: 175 Boredom-Busting, Zero-Prep Team Builder for All Ages.

Ragsdale and Saylor recommend certain disciplines to adults to foster gratitude, especially because some personalities tend to be more negative than positive. Try these tips:

  • Decide. Decide you’re going to be as present as you can to each moment and find the joy.
  • Every day, embrace what’s good. When something good happens, stop, note it, and receive it as the gift it is.
  • Hit replay. Savor what’s good. Re-picture it and turn it into an experience.
  • Share gratitude. Sharing is a happiness booster: hold open a door, help someone cross the street, or take a moment to listen.

Finally, here are some tips to use with young people to develop their sense of gratitude:

  • List it. Have youth create a list of the little blessings, joys, and graces that they have experienced recently.
  • Journal it. Allow youth time to journal about things they are grateful for each day.
  • Share it. Include a “circle of gratitude” time, inviting each person to share one thing he or she is grateful for.

You can find dozens of strategies to help young people discover their inner strengths and passions inGroups, Troops, Clubs, & Classrooms. The book includes numerous games, activities, icebreakers, and quizzes to keep you and your young people engaged and motivated.

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar® on Tour for a Second Stop in Arkansas

November 9th, 2016

As Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar has made its first tour across the country engaging youth in both classroom and after-school settings, creators Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor couldn’t be more pleased with the response and look forward to seeing Brain Boosters in even more places where the activities can interact with youth groups and bring energy and fun brain development!

Here’s a review from a “tour” stop in Little Rock, Arkansas with Our House:

“The youth and adults, who facilitated the activity, preferred the 20 second challenges because they were quick and simple. In addition, the youth enjoyed the Show Me Your Moves cards because they were able to improvise and “think on their feet.”
“The instructions were simple, therefore it took very little time to explain the instructions to the youth. Please note that we tested this on youth K – 8th grade.

“The youth said the following:

  • It was fun!
  • It got us moving!
  • We had to think fast!
  • It required us to work as a team!
  • We had to use our brain
  • We were able to get some energy out

“Most of the students liked acting out the various scenarios but some youth felt extremely uncomfortable because they do not like being the center of attention. (editor’s note:  the activities do include the right to “pass”).  Our group did not like the activities that required additional time (5 – 10 minutes). We passed over all of the cards that required an extensive amount of time.

“We would recommend this to other programs – It is an easy way to get the kids moving, thinking, and working together.”

- Desirae Holmes, Our House

Jar_3d

  Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

  Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar®: a Stop in Indiana

November 2nd, 2016

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar by Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor made a stop in Indiana with The Journey program (www.thejourneyonline.org).  It’s review was shared with youth workers across the state in their newsletter and Facebook page.  We hope Brain Boosters will schedule more appearances as a result of its stop here!  Thanks, Janet!

the-journey

Jar_3d

Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16

National Service Dates for November

November 1st, 2016

Veterans Day (November 11)

Plan something to honor veterans in your community!

http://www.va.gov/opa/vetsday/

Connect Four for Group

October 28th, 2016

My son’s friend Lilly leads games for American Heritage girls every once in awhile. Last week, she created a giant Connect Four game to play with the group. she rolled pieces of tape to put on the walls where players could “drop” the connect four checkers (red and blue plates).  Then groups competed to see which team could connect four dots (horizontally, vertically or diagonally) the fastest.  Such a fun idea!

connect-4 connect-4b

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar®: on Tour in Arkansas

October 26th, 2016

In its trek across the country, Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar by Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor made its way to Arkansas over the summer to engage youth and build the brain through fun, interactive ways.  Here’s what the staff from Life Skills for Youth had to say:

Our youth liked the 20-second Challenges, Show Me Your Moves and Make a Melody games the best.  Some of the favorite activities were  the music challenges and showing off their moves – making up skits.  They liked making a song to the star spangled banner.  I would say what they most liked about the activities overall was the chance they had to express themselves in front of classmates.  The activities were amusing for their peers. 

The only critique was that some students thought some of the music items could have been a bit more relatable for their age group (over 15).

What I enjoyed most, as a facilitator, was  was the engagement and humor for those who participated.  I would recommend these activities to other programs.  The activities created involvement between students and teacher.  It allowed children to work together and support their classmates.

- Gary Casey, Life Skills for Youth

Jar_3d

Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16

Rules of Kindness with generationOn

October 21st, 2016
Here is a set of kindness rules that some Pleasant View Elementary School 4th graders created with their counselor Ms. Megan.  It’s part of a national movement with generationOn to get students to write rules of kindness for the their interactions with others.  I love the idea of letting students collaborate to write their own rules of kindness.  When they create and own the rules, they are much more likely to follow them!
ann

Kindness Rules

written by 4th graders at Pleasant View Elementary School

1.     Look for others who need someone to play with.

2.     Say something kind to someone every day.

3.     Help people when they are feeling down or hurt.

4.     Be kind to one another.

5.     Encourage others.

6.     Be respectful to teachers and staff.

7.     Pay attention.

8.     When others are talking, be quiet and listen.

9.     Be nice to others – treat people the way you want to be treated.

10.  Make people feel welcome.

11.  Everywhere you go offer a smile.

12.  Be respectful.

13.  Do your best.

14.  Be caring to yourself and others.

15.  Be responsible.

16.  Take turns – let others play on the playground.

17.  Be on time.

18.  Show empathy for others.

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar®: A Teacher’s Review

October 19th, 2016

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar is definitely a very worthwhile, unique find.   I have used it in my classroom in many different ways since it serves multiple purposes.  My students, primarily 5th graders, have absolutely loved the crazy challenges found on the cards.

 

This game comes with 101 small cards in a plastic jar and a die.  There are four categories: Make a Melody, Show Me Your Moves, 20-Second Challenge, and Wild Cards.  The 20- second challenges are my favorite.  These cards are great for when students need a quick break from long stretches of learning, yet I do not want to lose valuable instructional time.  Many of these cards include debates, like arguing whether texting or face-to-face conversation is more important.  Others include telling a story about a time the teller was brave, or acting out a scene from a movie.  With these cards, I usually give one to each of my six groups, and each person in the group gets to go around and do it.  Because each student only has 20 seconds, the groups get done at the same time, making it easy to resume the lesson.

 

The Make a Melody cards were my students’ favorite.  They elicited hilarious responses, such as singing a song using a cat or a dog voice (woof-woof or meow-meow), and seeing if the group could tell what it was.  The only problem with these is that when multiple groups are doing this category at once, the room gets pretty noisy! I ended up using these with the whole group, and would have one representative from each group perform them, and then they would rotate. This solution worked well.

 

Most of the Show Me Your Move cards require movement in the classroom, so they are great when I had to have indoor activity time.  Some of them include making up dance moves, completing stretches, and doing short relay races.

 

Wild Cards can be any mixture of the following, but most of them include writing and discussing.  My favorite ones are those that have students share information about themselves with each other, like their favorite hobbies.  The card also tells them to roll the die to determine how many things they share about that hobby with the group.  These really help students get along better in my classroom as they make stronger connections with each other.

 

I highly recommend choosing the cards that students receive. The one factor that I am always concerned about is time. It was very important for me to pre-select the cards, as some of them can be more time-consuming than others.  I also factor in noise level of the cards occasionally, depending on how I use the cards that day.  Selecting them matters as well because some of them need materials, like tape, balls, and various other objects.

 

Students do always have the choice to pass if they feel too uncomfortable doing the activities.  On the first day we tried the cards, I had a handful of students who did not want to participate.  However, once they realized how much fun the other students were having who did participate, everyone engaged with them from then on.

 

Ways that I utilize them in my classroom:

  •  Short brain breaks for students during long periods of work time (like essay writing)
  • Icebreakers/getting to know you activities when students are placed in new groups
  • During indoor activity time
  • As tie-breakers following review games (especially the 20-second challenges)
  • At the beginning of the year as students simply get used to group rotations
  • As bellwork when the card coincides with the lesson (debate cards, for example)

 

There are many other ways that the cards can be used, I am sure! I am very pleased with them, and I definitely plan on using them in my classroom again this year.  Overall, this is a great product, and it certainly deserves two-thumbs up!

- Bethany Riggs Weeks, Fifth Grade Language Arts & Volleyball Coach

Sycamore Middle School

 Jar_3d

 

Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar®: On Tour with 4-H

October 12th, 2016

Brain Boosters for Groups in a Jar by Susan Ragsdale and Ann Saylor has been making its debute”tour” since its inception in April.  This summer found it making a pro-longed stop to engage youth with the 4-H program.  Here’s what one “fan” had to say about the experience:

“Brain Boosters for groups in a jar is PERFECT for my needs! In my role with the 4-H program, I work with teens who are in leadership roles. Working with teens can already be challenging so this resource is ideal! This jar is chock full of quick, meaningful and engaging activities! Yet another outstanding product from Ann and Susan!”

– Justin Crowe, Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth Development, University of Tennessee Extension

Review originally posted on his FB page:  https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=9434499&fref=nf

4-H is one of Brain Boosters for Groups biggest fans.  Thank you, 4-H!

 

Jar_3d

Get the jar directly from Free Spirit or online from Barnes and Noble or Amazon.

Click to order: http://tinyurl.com/boosters16